Bing Contract Prohibits DuckDuckGo From Completely Blocking Microsoft Tracking

Bing Contract Prohibits DuckDuckGo From Completely Blocking Microsoft Tracking
DuckDuckGo isn’t as private as you thought. “Due to a confidential search agreement, the DuckDuckGo browser does not block all Microsoft trackers,” reports Review Geek. “What’s worse, DuckDuckGo only acknowledged this ‘privacy hole’ after it was discovered by a security researcher.” From the report: Security researcher @thezedwards found that the mobile DuckDuckGo browser does not block Microsoft trackers on third-party websites, such as the Facebook-owned Workplace.com. Gabriel Weinberg, the CEO of DuckDuckGo, is now running damage control on Twitter. He explains that Microsoft cannot see what you search in DuckDuckGo, and the DuckDuckGo browser blocks all Microsoft cookies. But if you visit a website that contains Microsoft’s trackers, then your data is exposed to services like Bing and LinkedIn. This is the result of DuckDuckGo’s “search syndication agreement” with Microsoft. In order to pull search information from Bing, the privacy experts at DuckDuckGo have to poke holes in their browser’s security system.

While DuckDuckGo has a solid privacy policy when it comes to Microsoft’s ads, it hasn’t explained how Microsoft uses data from third-party trackers. And that’s quite alarming. Maybe this situation is overblown, or maybe Microsoft can build targeted ad profiles based on your web activity in DuckDuckGo — we don’t know because DuckDuckGo signed a confidentiality agreement. Gabriel Weinberg says that DuckDuckGo is “working tirelessly behind the scenes” to improve its deal with Microsoft. Additionally, he expects DuckDuckGo to “include more third-party Microsoft protection” in a future update.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.