Amazon Ends Widely Mocked Scheme That Turned Workers Into Twitter ‘Ambassadors’

Amazon Ends Widely Mocked Scheme That Turned Workers Into Twitter ‘Ambassadors’
An anonymous reader quotes a report from Ars Technica: Amazon has killed a program under which it paid warehouse employees to say nice things about the company on social media. “Amazon quietly shut down and removed all traces of the influence campaign at the end of last year, people with direct knowledge of the decision told the Financial Times,” FT reported today. FT noted that the social media program suffered from “poor reach and embarrassing backfires.”

Amazon began paying workers to tweet in 2018 in a widely mocked effort to counter negative perceptions about the company. As Business Insider reported in August 2018, “The company now has a small army of ‘FC Ambassadors’ saying nice things about the company online and engaging in dialogue with average Twitter users. The ambassadors are full-time employees, according to an Amazon spokesperson, and it is their job to share their experiences working at a fulfillment center.”

“FC” stands for fulfillment centers, and the “ambassadors” worked in the Amazon warehouses before being paid to tweet, and in at least some cases, they split duties between the warehouse and Twitter. “I get paid $15/hr whether I am answering tweets or out on the floor stowing. I do this 2 days a week and 2 days a week I stow,” one Amazon employee explained in 2019, as seen in a Bellingcat report that found 53 Amazon FC Ambassador accounts on Twitter. “The ‘ambassador’ program was always a laughable attempt to minimize the abuses unfolding inside Amazon warehouses,” Warehouse Worker Resource Center Executive Director Sheheryar Kaoosji told the Financial Times.

Read more of this story at Slashdot.